Next Stop: Nursing ENewsletters

August 2007 Next Stop: Nursing


 
 

Nursing School Survival Tips 

By Laura Gilbert, Next Stop: Nursing editor 

The first thing nursing student Leilani Fraley does when she gets ready to head back to class after a break is buy a personal organizer and note all tests, projects and deadlines in it.

Read more

 
 

 

Each month, Next Stop: Nursing features sample questions from the NCLEX-RN, provided by our partner The College Network. 

Question: A patient who is hypothyroid is at risk for developing which of these conditions? 

A. Cushing's syndrome.
B. Addison's disease.
C. Myxedema coma.
D. Thyroid storm. 

Question: A nurse should plan to closely monitor a woman who has type I diabetes mellitus during her pregnancy for which of these complications? 

A. Oligohydramnios.
B. Hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome.
C. Polycythemia.
D. Urinary tract infection. 

Answers
  

 

Beyond TV Stereotypes: Students Can Shape Nursing's Image 

By Megan M. Krischke, contributor  

Nursing has changed dramatically over the last few years-along with those who choose to go into the profession. Yet the public, fueled by media misperceptions, has failed to accurately grasp the vital role nurses plays in modern health care.

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Stephanie Thibeault, RN, BSN, answers your most pressing questions about nursing school and beyond. 

A reader asks: Do you know of any online resources that offer free or low-cost access to peer- and/or board-reviewed nursing articles?

Stephanie answers
 
 

 
 
 

DEFINITION OF
THE MONTH
  

olighydramnios (ol'i-go-hi-dram'ne-os) 

The presence of an insufficient amount of amniotic fluid (less than 300 mL at term). 

Source: Stedman's Medical Dictionary 

 
 

Is Emergency Nursing for Me? 

A new nurse in the emergency department can expect every day to be different. The variety of patients means you will see diverse diseases or injuries-but the skills to assess and provide intervention will begin to come into focus. You build upon each experience to prepare you for your next patient, according to Nancy Bonalumi, RN, MS, CEN, director of emergency nursing at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania.

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Xigris for Severe Sepsis 

By Robin Varela, RN, BSN, contributor 

Severe sepsis is the 10th-leading cause of death in the U.S. The mortality rate for sepsis remains high, estimated at between 28 percent and 50 percent. One out of 10 patients admitted to the ICU experience severe sepsis.

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Next Stop: Nursing scans the latest medical and nursing journals to provide you with the most up-to-date clinical content available. 

Cancer Survivors Test Diet High in Fruits, Veggies 

A study by the National Cancer Institute found that women who adopted a low-fat diet that was very rich in vegetables, fruit and fiber after breast cancer treatment did did not reduce their risk of recurrence compared with women who consumed five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

Read more 

Legal Power and Legal Rights-Isolation and Quarantine in the Case of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis 

The recent case of Atlanta attorney Andrew Speaker has focused attention on the role of compulsory isolation and quarantine in tuberculosis control, as discussed in this perspective in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Read more
 
 

 

 10 Must-Have Nursing Books 

What books are crucial for nursing students? We've informally polled a selection of nursing students from those just starting out to those who have recently graduated to get recommendations on the best books for nursing students. 

If you agree or disagree, let us know-and we'll include your feedback in a future issue of the newsletter. 

   Pocket Guide to APA Style by Robert Perrin 
   Diseases (Lippincott Professional Guides) 
   Where Do I Go From Here? Exploring Your Career Alternatives Within and Beyond Clinical Nursing by Betty Hafner 
   2007 Intravenous Medications: A Handbook for Nurses and Health Professionals by Betty Gahart and Adrienne Nazareno 
   Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice (8th Edition) by Sandra Nettina 
   Davis's Drug Guide for Nurses (10th Edition) by Judith Hopfer Deglin and April Hazard Vallerand 
   Nursing Diagnosis Reference Manual by Sheila Sparks and Cynthia Taylor 
   Taber's Cycloped Medical Dictionary (Thumb Index) by Donald Venes 
   Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: A Guide to Planning Care by Betty Ackley 
   Brunner and Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing by Suzanne Smeltzer, Brenda Bare, Janice Hinkle and Kerry Cheever 

Plus, check out these additional recommendations: Stressed Out about Nursing School! An Insider's Guide to Success by Stephanie Thibeault, How to Survive and Maybe Even Love Nursing School!: A Guide for Students by Students by Kelli Dunham and Training Wheels for Nurses: What I Wish I Had Known My First 100 Days on the Job: Wisdom, Tips, and Warnings from Experienced Nurses by Barbara Arnoldussen 

Special thanks to Leilani Fraley, Yuliya Shakhlevichand and Autumn Cobbs for assistance with this compilation! 

If you have a different suggestion of books for this list, or have a suggestion for a list topic, please send an e-mail with your name and topic suggestion to Laura.Gilbert@nursezone.com.
 

 

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